Subalpine Ecological Zone

A transition zone between the montane and alpine regions, the subalpine vegetation zone, which ranges from 10,000 to 11,500 feet in elevation, features thick forests, especially at lower elevations, and moist meadows. This region

receives 25 to 40 inches of precipitation per year, the vast majority of which comes from snow. Indeed, the zone receives between 250 and 350 inches of snow per year.

As a result of harsh winds at high elevation, trees growing close to 11,500 often display stunted top-level growth while forming thick forests. This phenomenon is referred to as krummholz.

A transition zone between the montane and alpine regions, the subalpine vegetation zone, which ranges from 10,000 to 11,500 feet in elevation, features thick forests, especially at lower elevations, and moist meadows.

This region receives 25 to 40 inches of precipitation per year, the vast majority of which comes from snow. Indeed, the zone receives between 250 and 350 inches of snow per year.

As a result of harsh winds at high elevation, trees growing close to 11,500 often display stunted top-level growth while forming thick forests. This phenomenon is referred to as krummholz.

photo of a subalpine meadow full of yellow and blue flowers

Some Interesting and Important Subalpine Plant Communities

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Plants of the Subalpine Region

Plant photos are in alphabetical order by scientific name.
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Rare Plants

Common Plants